Assessment in Wales

Teachers in Wales continue to experience significant assessment-related workload burdens.

These are often driven by the requirements of the Literacy and Numeracy Framework (LNF), demands made on teachers by local authorities and consortia, and expectations associated with school inspection.

The NASUWT is clear that many of these burdens serve simply to distract teachers and school leaders from their core responsibilities for teaching and leading teaching and learning and thereby undermine rather than support work to raise standards.

The New Curriculum, building on the outcomes of the 2014 Donaldson Review, will have a significant impact on assessment practice in schools.

The NASUWT continues to engage with the Welsh Government and other bodies to ensure that the Union’s principles are reflected fully in reform of the assessment framework.

The NASUWT’s action short of strike action instructions are in place to protect you from excessive assessment-related workload burdens. You should use these instructions and seek further advice and support from the NASUWT if necessary if you have concerns about assessment in your school.

The NASUWT continues to engage actively with the Welsh Government on the introduction of National Reading and Numeracy Tests. Further information about the Union’s work in this area is available in this section of the website.

The NASUWT recognises that assessment is critical to effective approaches to teaching and learning. The forms that assessment takes, the uses to which assessment data is put, and the context within which assessment is undertaken are therefore critical aspects of educational policy and practice at national, local and school level.

Assessment in schools takes a number of different forms and serves a number of distinct purposes.

Assessment should be used by teachers to enable them to form valid and reliable judgements of pupils’ progress for the development of the curriculum.

Data from assessment has also become an integral feature of how schools and the education system as a whole are held to account for their performance.

The NASUWT continues to press for the adoption of assessment practices in schools that allow teachers to concentrate on tasks and activities that help pupils achieve and make progress and that do not result in excessive and unnecessary workload burdens.